Over the next few weeks the catalog website will be transitioning to the look of the new college website (northampton.edu). The catalog URLs and pages WILL NOT change so you will not need to worry about any links to the catalog and bookmarks becoming broken. Thank you for your patience.

General Education Core Curriculum (GE)

What is General Education at Northampton Community College?
An undergraduate degree is comprised of three parts: courses in the major, elective courses, and courses in the General Education Core Curriculum. Major courses define the program of study. Students choose electives that fit their individual interests. The General Education Core Curriculum is the part of the academic experience that all students have in common.

The GE Core defines an important set of knowledge and skills that will help our graduates to continue learning, adapt to change, and become citizens who can make wise choices and contribute to their community.

The General Education Core Curriculum is designed to go hand in hand with the major courses to develop skills that will serve students in their academic study, careers, and in their lives. Though in some designated GE Core courses the focus will be on particular outcomes, we expect that the knowledge and skills that are part of the GE Core Curriculum will be reinforced throughout the other major courses and electives

Courses satisfying various General Education Core requirements are listed below by category; such requirements must be satisfied by selecting courses from among the listings below. Unless otherwise specified, they are applicable to all degrees (A.A./A.S./A.A.S.).

General Education Core Goals and Learning Outcomes

I. Knowledge of Arts, Cultures and the Natural World

ARTS & HUMANITIES

Goal: Students should understand both the creative process and how works of human imagination and thought from diverse cultures, places, and times express varieties of human experience.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Students will discuss, analyze and interpret works that confront, express, and examine human experience.
  • Students will describe and explain the ways that language, literature, philosophy, or the visual and performing arts challenge or reinforce specific cultural or historic values and conditions.

SOCIAL SCIENCE

Goal: Students will demonstrate knowledge of Societies and Institutions Over Time (SIT) and the Scientific Study of Human Behavior (SSHB).

Learning Outcomes:

  • Students will identify and apply social science theories and concepts to behavioral or societal issues. (SIT & SSHB)
  • Students will explain how a social science discipline describes and analyzes social change or human behavior.
  • Students will describe how people’s experiences and perspectives are shaped by sex, gender, ethnicity, class, age, race, culture and other factors.

Note: Social science courses must address the first outcome and one of the two remaining outcomes.

SCIENCE

Goal: Students will demonstrate a working knowledge of scientific principles and concepts and be able to apply them to daily situations.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Students will explain the scientific method, recognizing the potential for uncertainty in the scientific inquiry.
  • Students will apply basic field and laboratory skills used for collecting and analyzing data according to the particular discipline.

DIVERSITY AND GLOBAL AWARENESS

Goal: Students will demonstrate an understanding of human diversity and an awareness of global issues through analysis of arts, histories, cultures, geographies, economics, medicine, scientific data and/or institutions.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Students will discuss and explain how the diverse range of human differences influences the historical and current formation of artistic, economic, social, scientific, cultural or political institutions.
  • Students will examine how the range of human differences influences each individual’s experience of equality and inequality within a society, its institutions, or its cultures.
  • Students will analyze how individuals and institutions have addressed persistent global challenges.

Note: to carry a diversity designation, the course needs to address at least one of the three outcomes.

II. Intellectual and Practical Skills

COMMUNICATION

Goal: Students will present and support ideas in an organized and coherent manner consistent with the intended audience and purpose in both speaking and writing.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Students will identify, analyze, and choose supporting materials in written and spoken communication.
  • Students will organize information with a central idea or thesis.
  • Students will differentiate among various audience needs in word choice, level of explanation, and method of presentation.

COMPUTER LITERACY

Goal: Students will use computer technology as a tool for communication and productivity both professionally and personally.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Students will demonstrate knowledge of computer concepts and terminology.
  • Students will create, store, retrieve, and print formatted documents.
  • Students will evaluate ethical uses of technology.

QUANTITATIVE LITERACY

Goal: Students will interpret and analyze quantitative data to solve problems.

Learning Outcomes

  • Students will interpret, analyze, and draw conclusions about data presented as words, abstract symbols, tables or graphs.
  • Students will use mathematics to model events and solve problems.
  • Students will communicate using mathematical language, symbols, data, and graphs.

INFORMATION LITERACY

Goal: Students will demonstrate research skills in gathering, evaluating, and using information.

Learning Outcomes

  • Students will locate and identify information
  • Students will evaluate source information and incorporate it into their work.
  • Students will use source information in an ethical and legal fashion.

CRITICAL THINKING AND PROBLEM SOLVING

Goal: Students will think critically and propose solutions to open-ended problems.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Students will analyze and evaluate information, ideas and arguments in order to form conclusions.
  • Students will design and evaluate a plan that addresses an open-ended problem.

Note: to carry a critical thinking designation, the course must address at least one of the two outcomes.

Arts and Humanities (AH)

ARCH 100 - Architectural History I - Antiquity to 1870 (Architecture only)
ARTA 100 - Art and Visual Thinking
ARTA 101 - Art History Survey
CMTH 110 - Introduction to the Theatre
CMTH 111 - Acting I
CMTH 115 - Technical Theatre
CMTH 117 - Stagecraft
CMTH 126 - The Communication Arts
CMTH 189 - Stage Voice and Movement
CMTH 190 - Stage Production
CMTH 206 - Directing
CMTH 211G - Plays: Classical to Contemporary
CMTH 212 - Acting II
CMTH 218 - Theatre Portfolio
CMTH 220 - Introduction to Film
DANC 101 - Dance History
DANC 110 - Ballet I
DANC 120 - Modern Dance I
DANC 130 - Jazz I
DANC 210 - Ballet II
DANC 220 - Modern Dance II
DANC 230 - Jazz II
ENGL 201G - British Literature I
ENGL 203G- Shakespeare
ENGL 205G - American Literature I
ENGL 211G- Plays: Classical to Contemporary
ENGL 215G- Multicultural Adolescent Literature
ENGL 250G- Latin American Literature
ENGL 251G- British Literature II
ENGL 253 - Creative Writing
ENGL 255G - American Literature II
ENGL 256G - Modern Poetry
ENGL 257G - 20th Century Literature by Women: Self-Images and Self-Awareness
ENGL 260G - Contemporary Literature
ENGL 264G - Irish Literature
ENGL 265G - African-American Literature
ENGL 267 - Poetry Writing
HUMA 121 - The American Work Experience
HUMA 140 - Introduction to Women and Gender Studies
HUMA 150 - Nature of the Environment
JOUR 101 - Journalism and Society
MDLA 102 - Elementary French I
MDLA 103 - Elementary Spanish I
MDLA 105 - Elementary Chinese I
MDLA 112 - Elementary French II
MDLA 113 - Elementary Spanish II
MDLA 115 - Elementary Chinese II
MDLA 122 - Intermediate French I
MDLA 123 - Intermediate Spanish I
MDLA 133 - Intermediate Spanish II
MUSC 101 - Introduction to Music
PHIL 111 - On Death and Dying
PHIL 121 - World Religions
PHIL 201 - Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 202 - Ethics and Moral Problems
PHIL 204 - Asian Philosophies
PHIL 211 - Ancient Philosophy
PHIL 215 - Modern Philosophy
PHIL 220 - Existentialism
 

Critical Thinking (CT)

CJST 111 - American Legal System
CJST 115 - Criminal Law
CJST 121G - Criminology
CJST 250 - Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice
ENGL 255G - American Literature II
ENGL 260G - Contemporary Literature
HIST 173 - Modern European History: 1815 - Present
GEOG 210 - Meteorology
PHIL 111 - On Death & Dying
POLS 101 - Introduction to Political Science
POLS 105G - American Constitution Law
POLS 202 - International Relations
POLS 251 - State and Local Government
SOCA 102 - Cultural Anthropology
SOCA 103 - Principles of Sociology
SOCA 150 - Deviance
 

Social Science: Societies and Institutions over Time (SIT)

ARCH 155 - Architectural History II - 1870 to Present (A.A.S. only)
CMTH 221 - History of Broadcasting (Radio/TV only)
GEOG 101 - World Geography
GEOG 151 - Geography of the United States and Canada
GEOG 221 - Contemporary Middle East
HIST 103 - Ancient and Medieval History
HIST 113 - American History I
HIST 121 - The Black Experience
HIST 140 - Modern Chinese History
HIST 153 - Foundations of Modern European History, 1300-1815
HIST 163 - American History II
HIST 166 - Civil War and Reconstruction
HIST 167 - Vietnam
HIST 168 - History of the Middle East
HIST 173 - Modern European History, 1815 to Present
HIST 210 - History of Modern Science, 1859 to Present
HIST 211 - History of Pennsylvania
INTS 201 - Implementing Sustainable Energy Systems in Developing Communities
POLS 101 - Introduction to Political Science
POLS 105G - American Constitutional Law
POLS 110 - American National Government
POLS 150 - Peace Studies and Conflict Resolution (Study Abroad)
POLS 170 - Politics of Modern Turkey (Study Abroad)
POLS 202 - International Relations
POLS 205 - Women and Politics
POLS 251 - State and Local Government
SOCA 102 - Cultural Anthropology
SOCA 105 - American Ethnicity


Social Science: Scientific Study of Human Behavior (SSHB)

ECON 201 - Macroeconomics
GEOG 121 - Environmental Sustainability
GEOG 140 - Investigating Climate Change
PSYC 103 - Introduction to Psychology
PSYC 230 - Introduction to Health Psychology
PSYC 235 - Developmental Child Psychpathology
PSYC 245 - Cognitive Psychology
PSYC 258 - Developmental Psychology
PSYC 265 - Psychology of Sex and Gender
SOCA 103 - Principles of Sociology
SOCA 125 - Sociology of Families
SOCA 210 - Sociology of Gender


Quantitative Literacy (QL)

MATH 103 - Applications in Mathematics (A.A.S. only)
MATH 118 - Foundations of Mathematics I (Middle Level Education, Early Childhood Education & Special Education only)
MATH 119 - Foundations of Mathematics II (Middle Level Education & Early Childhood Education only)
MATH 120 - The Nature of Mathematics
MATH 140 - College Algebra
MATH 145 - Trigonometry
MATH 150 - Introductory Statistics
MATH 160 - Pre-Calculus
MATH 165 - Applied Calculus
MATH 175 - Calculus with Precalculus (part 1)
MATH 176 - Calculus with Precalculus (part 2)
MATH 180 - Calculus I
MATH 181 - Calculus II
MATH 210 - Calculus III
MATH 211 - Differential Equations


Science (SCI)

BIOS 104 - Field Ecology
BIOS 105 - Contemporary Biology
BIOS 107 - Biology I
BIOS 110 - In Your Genes: Introduction to Modern Genetics
BIOS 115 - Essentials of Biology
BIOS 126 - Environmental Science
BIOS 150 - Biology II
BIOS 160 - Human Biology
BIOS 202 - Microbiology
BIOS 204 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I
BIOS 206 - General Ecology
CHEM 105 - Chemistry in Contemporary Society
CHEM 120 - General Chemistry I
CHEM 135 - Chemistry of Life
GEOG 150 - Astronomy
GEOG 210 - Meteorology
GEOL 201 - Physical Geology
PHYS 101 - Physics I
PHYS 152 - Physical Science II
PHYS 215 - Physics for Science and Engineering


Diversity and Global Awareness (D)

BIOS 126 - Environmental Science
BIOS 210 - Environmental Biology
CJST 250 - Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice (Criminal Justice program only)
CMTH 126 - The Communication Arts
CMTH 211G - Plays: Classical to Contemporary
CMTH 215 - Intercultural Communication
ENGL 151L - English II (Literature)
ENGL 205G - American Literature I
ENGL 211G - Plays: Classical to Contemporary
ENGL 215G - Multicultural Adolescent Literature
ENGL 250G - Contemporary Latin American Literature in Translation
ENGL 253 - Creative Writing
ENGL 255G - American Literature II
ENGL 256G - Modern Poetry
ENGL 257G - 20th Century Literature by Women: Self-Images and Self-Awareness
ENGL 260G - Contemporary Literature
ENGL 264G - Irish Literature
ENGL 265G - African-American Literature
ENGL 267 - Poetry Writing
GEOG 101 - World Geography
GEOG 121 - Environmental Sustainability
GEOG 210 - Meteorology
HIST 113 - American History I
HIST 121 - The Black Experience
HIST 140 - Modern Chinese History
HIST 166 - Civil War and Reconstruction
HIST 168 - History of the Middle East
HIST 173 - Modern European History: 1815 to present
HUMA 121 - American Work Experience
HUMA 140 - Introduction to Women and Gender Studies
HUMA 150 - Nature of the Environment
INTS 201 - Implementing Sustainable Energy Systems in Developing Communities
MDLA 102 - Elementary French I
MDLA 103 - Elementary Spanish I
MDLA 105 - Elementary Chinese I
MDLA 112 - Elementary French II
MDLA 113 - Elementary Spanish II
MDLA 115 - Elementary Chinese II
MDLA 122 - Intermediate French I
MDLA 123 - Intermediate Spanish I
MDLA 133 - Intermediate Spanish II
PHIL 111 - On Death and Dying
PHIL 121 - World Religions
PHIL 204 - Asian Philosophies
POLS 101 - Introduction to Political Science
POLS 105G - American Constitutional Law
POLS 150 - Peace Studies and Conflict Resolution (Study Abroad)
POLS 170 - Politics of Modern Turkey (Study Abroad)
POLS 202 - International Relations
POLS 251 - State and Local Government
PSYC 230 - Introduction to Health Psychology
PSYC 258 - Developmental Psychology
SOCA 102 - Cultural Anthropology
SOCA 103 - Principles of Sociology
SOCA 105 - American Ethnicity
SOCA 150 - Deviance
 
Information Literacy
 
ENGL 101 - English I
ENGL 151 - English II
CMTH 102 - Speech Communication
All courses listed as Communication: Writing Intensive General Education Courses (WI)
All courses listed as Communication: Writing Intensive Program Courses (WI)


Communication: Writing Intensive General Education Courses (WI)

ARCH 100G - Architectural History - Antiquity to 1870
BIOS 105G - Contemporary Biology
CMTH 211G - Plays: Classical to Contemporary
ENGL 201G - British Literature I
ENGL 203G - Shakespeare
ENGL 205G - American Literature I
ENGL 211G - Plays: Classical to Contemporary
ENGL 215G - Multicultural Adolescent Literature
ENGL 250G - Contemporary Latin American Literature in Translation
ENGL 251G - British Literature II
ENGL 255G - American Literature II
ENGL 256G - Modern Poetry
ENGL 257G - 20th Century Literature by Women: Self-Images and Self-Awareness
ENGL 260G - Contemporary Literature
ENGL 264G - Irish Literature
ENGL 265G - African-American Literature
GEOG 121G - Environmental Sustainability
GEOG 151G - Geography of the United States and Canada
GEOG 221G - Contemporary Middle East
HIST 113G - American History I
HIST 121G - The Black Experience
HIST 153G - Foundations of Modern European History 1300-1815
HIST 166G - Civil War and Reconstruction
HIST 168G - History of the Middle East
HIST 173G - Modern European History, 1815 to Present
HUMA 121G - The American Work Experience
HUMA 140G - Introduction to Women and Gender Studies
PHIL 111G - On Death and Dying
PHIL 202G - Ethics and Moral Problems
POLS 105G - American Constitutional Law
POLS 110G - American National Government
POLS 205G - Women and Politics
POLS 251G - State and Local Government
PSYC 103G - Introduction to Psychology
PSYC 258G - Developmental Psychology
SOCA 102G - Cultural Anthropology
SOCA 103G - Principles of Sociology
SOCA 125G - Sociology of Families


Communication: Writing Intensive Program Courses (WI)

AUTO 203G - Automotive Shop Management Practices
BIOS 250G - Introduction to Cell & Molecular Biology
BUSA 221G - Business Communication
CHEM 201G - Organic Chemistry I
CJST 121G - Criminology
CMTH 225G - Scriptwriting
CMTH 230G - Introduction to Communication Theory
DENH 251G - Preventive Oral Health Services I
DMSG 215G - Small Parts & Special Topics
EARL 263G - Early Childhood Internship
ECON 251G - Microeconomics
EDUC 260G - Adolescent Development and Cognition
ELEC 272G - Computer Electronics Practicum II
ELTC 260 G - Electrical Construction Practicum
EMEC 260G - Electromechanical Technology Practicum
HOSP 221G - Hospitality Practicum
HVAC 260G - HVAC/R Technology Practicum
JOUR 203G - Writing for Public Relations
OFAD 221G - Business Communication
PARL 215G - Legal Research and Writing
PSYC 251G - Child Psychology
QUAL 221G - Applied Quality Practicum
SMAT 245G - Acute Care of Illness and Injury
SPED 205G - Special Education Paraeducator Internship
SPRT 152G - Sports in Society
VETC 215G - Animal Diseases

© Northampton Community College 3835 Green Pond Rd Bethlehem, PA 18020 610-861-5300